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20121002
20121010
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
chief michael hayden about the aftermath of the benghazi attack. >>> and on his decade in hiding after a threat was placed on his life. >>> also, if china's growth slows, should the rest of us cheer? no. >>> first, here's my take. the pundit dees claired mitt romney the winner. he was. obama seemed passive, detached, and glum. but what's more significant than how romney said things is what he said. romney repeatedly insisted he was not advocating a big tax kuchlt in fact, he declared unequivocally that he would not cut taxes at all if they added to the deficit at all. now, as "the washington post" reporter checks out, for two years rom hi has been campaigning on a tax cut that would cost around $5 trillion over ten years. he said he would eliminate deductions and spending to pay for it. he never offers details. he did say he would cut funding for public broadcasting which was 0.01% in 2012. medicaid was 0.13%. romney also spoke in favor of regulations including much of the dodd/frank bill and he repeatedly held up as a model his health care plan in massachusetts which has added center
immediate right is michael howe who's the technical cofounder of the fourth of state project as well as the architect of the platform that runs both enterprises. the project focuses on driving media coverage of the election 2012. and i think he'll have a very interesting powerpoint presentation to make to us. to my immediate left is amy davidson, senior editor at the new yorker. she's been at the magazine since 1995, writes a blog and contributes to the magazine's pages. next is anna sale who's a political reporter for wnyc radio politics site, it's a free country.org. she covered the gop primaries, my condolences -- [laughter] and focuses on swing states far away from political rallies. sounds like a much better assignment. [laughter] she appears on the takeaway and contributed to npr, bbc, wgvh, new york 1 and pbs. next to her is greg marx who's a staff writer for the columbia journalism review, co-editor of cjr's swing state project. he was a writer for remapping debate.org, and if you've seen his writings, which i have fold over the last few week -- followed over the last few wee
-- in "60 minutes." michael wallace points his finger and says you're a dictator. several times he said that. he laughed. after many years, people thought his approach was very smart. it made michael wallace embarrassed. if you do the same thing with xi jinping, it will be a disaster. we need to know this kind of mindset, this kind of experience. that is why what henry kissinger said early on this important. -- is important. it will shape their point of view and their behavior. there is tremendous room for cooperation but also dangerous. >> i think you said they experienced during the cultural revolution hard in this generation. how does this bear out in how they view domestic policies and -- in china? or is not -- that not a factor? >> we cannot really know how they will perform an office because they are not there yet. there have been instances where people, where china was being criticized and he made a sharp response. i have had several conversations with xi and found him an extraordinarily thoughtful person who raised a number of philosophical questions. the problem they face is if you
michaels, first business network interview telling us about it and revealing its big celebrity spokesperson. somebody very famous will be their celebrity spokesperson. he will reveal that on fox business. you do not want to miss it. that is in the next hour. convicted insider trader raj rajaratnam should have followed the example of a lesser-known figure and fled the country rather than face years behind bars. recommending people flee the country? >> i knew someone who knew someone who fled to italy and a strong extradition treaty from italy to the u.s.. generally force you to come back. india and sri lanka where he is from, is not that strong. it is the interesting thing in this case. there is one fugitive, one person who was busted his name is deep shop, an analyst at moody's gave a tip to a woman who is the main witness on hilton being bought by blackstone and that was one of the counts he was convicted of. he is a fugitive. you went back to indiana and fired and indicted by the justice department and filed civil charges and there was one lame attempt to get him like a local magistrate t
. >> evan thomas on ikes bluff. new york city mayor michael bloomberg and news corporation executive rupert murdoch recently traveled to boston to give advice to the romney campaign about immigration policy. mayor bloomberg has a more of an earlier that day in chicago to advise the obama campaign. up next, the boston event with the two cochairs of the group partnership for a new american economy which supports immigration change as an economic issue. wall street journal executive jarosite moderates the discussion. you will hear from boston mayor thomas bonino. this is about an hour. [applause] >> so the council, needless to say, is very pleased to host a very special discussion on one of the most vexing issues of public policy facing our nation. how to develop and implement there, sensible, and forcible immigration policy. it is a topic that often is addressed with more heat than like. the partnership for a new american economy is working to change that tendency and to promote serious, intelligent, rational, and respectful engagement of that complex issue . we are especially honored to have
. in 1988, michael dukakis could have had help not looking so cold in his response. >> we have a professor at the george washington university, john sides. when you have those moments that reinforce a marriage, either good or for ill, to a candidate, how important or damaging can these be? >> candidate debates in a general election to not move the polls a general -- a lot. race.in a close debat in general, i think these dramatic moments in debates are not necessarily game changes for the average american voter. >> you wrote, usually the candidates fight to a drawl. . it is hard in that context to have a stunning victory or a terrible defeat. can you elaborate? >> the candidates spend a lot of time trying to lower their expectations about the performance and portray the other person as this great orator . in reality, the candidates spend a lot of time prepping for the debates and they are very good at it. they have read a lot of material and memorize a lot of material. in that context, it is hard for a candidate to really make a big enough mistake to actually swing opinion too strongly to h
michael moore, nancy pelosi. think your local college professor. you know, think the driver of the crazy car with all of the bush is hitler bumper stickers on the back of the car. think the gender studies wearing the head band at your local whole foods store. you get the picture; right? they no , nominate professions leaving a cultural imprint, cultures like journal ism, arts, academia, and america's fastest band of intertapers, circumstance day sew lay success bats. who are these people who call themselves liberals? how does such a small group impact our lives? what motivates them? i'm in an excellent position to answer the deep questions because i've been watching liberals closely for over 30 years, studied liberals like jane goodall studies her chimps. [laughter] in their natural habitats and without judgment, in silence mostly because we barely speak the same language. i've been tireless in research. i lived with liberals, broke bread with them, humored them, teased them, prodded them, and, yes, even loved some of them, some my friends, and some members of my own family. my commitme
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)